MIDI Sprout for iPhone Bundle On Sale Now!

midisprout-2.jpg

We are pleased to announce that the MIDI Sprout app is now available in the App Store. When connected to a MIDI Sprout via an iConnectivity MIDI to Lightning adapter, the MIDI Sprout app allows you to listen to your plants play harmonious sounds designed by our team of artists.

To celebrate the launch of the app, we’ve created a bundle for iPhone that includes everything you need to listen to your plants from your phone. Formerly a $360 purchase, you’ll get the MIDI Sprout and an iConnectivity MIDI to Lightning adapter for $300! Now listening to plants is as easy as plugging your MIDI Sprout into your phone!

BUY NOW

Plant Consciouness & Communication

A sonic expedition into a world where plants and humans communicate through music – Compiled and produced by Lisbon-based DJ, Carlo Patrão.

This guest mix, curated and produced by Lisbon-based DJ Carlo Patrão: zeppelinruc.wordpress.com/, was originally broadcast on Rádio Universidade de Coimbra: www.ruc.fm/ 107.9 FM. An accompanying guide to the music and studies featured can be found at zeppelinruc.wordpress.com: zeppelinruc.wordpress.com/2012/11/19/z…mmunication/.

0:00 Intro

1:01 Molly RothPlant Talk(Fragment) [Plant Talk/Sound Advice Plant Talk Productions 1976]

1:16 Jared C. Balogh Sugar Boogies (Fragment)[Detaching Realities Vol. 2 Headphonica 2012]

2:04 Purple Duck- Mating Season (Fragment) [Duck Side of the Moon Dualplover 2009]

2:05 Sound Effect:Solitary Bee viaFreesound.org

2:15 BBC Radiophonic Workshop- Garden In Springtime (Binaural) (Fragment) [Sound Effects Vol. 23 -Relaxing Sounds BBC Records 1979]

2:16 Rudy Vallée& His Connecticut Yankees Orchids in The Moonlight (Fragment) [Vitor]

2:26 Sound Effect:Tropical Rainforest IMAX HD(Fragment)

2:47 Martin Schutz& Hans Kach Amplified Insects I (Fragment) [Approximations Intakt Records 1990]

2:51 Jared C. Balogh Vanilla (Fragment) [Detaching Realities Surrism Phonoethics 2011]

2:54 Arnold Schoenberg-Verklarte Nacht Op.4 IV Adagi(Fragment)

3:01 untitled #2 (Fragment)

3:13 Sound Effect: Corn Pop by digifishmusic [Freesound]

3:13 Jim Denley&Espen Reinertsen-Bergerslagbroek (Fragment) [VA Bridges Machinefabriek Self-released 2011]

3:14 Polygon Window My Teapot (Fragment) [VA -Artificial Intelligence II Warp Records 1994]

3:21 Schoenberg- Gurrelieder Vorspiel (Fragment)

3:21 Jennifer Walshe- Nature Data For Voice (Fragment) [ Nature Data Interval Recordings 2005]

3:22 Audio Fragment from the TV documentaryIn Search of|episodeOther Voices Original air date4.17.1977

3:38 Yannick Dauby Home Phone (Fragment) [TW04-05 2006]

3:47 Yann Novak Shortwaves to Longwaves (Fragment) [VA Flowers: Dragon's Eye Fourth Anniversary Dragon's Eye Recordings 2010]

3:48 Louis and Bebe Barron- Robby Arranges Flowers Zaps Monkey (Fragment) [Forbidden Planet OST Planet Records 1976]

3:51 Lullatone- Poppy (Fragment) [Computer Recital Audio Dregs 2003]

3:54 Michael Prime- Listen To Peyote (Fragment) [L-Fields Sonoris 2000]

4:38 EU Vrect (Fragment) [EU_Soft Art-Tek 2000] S

4:41 Black Dice Greenhouse Tune (Fragment) [VA-Music For Plants PerfectIfOn 2005]

5:00 Georges Teperino/Cecil LeuterVideo Tronics1 (Fragment) [TV music 1969]

5:22 John Cage-Aria For Solo Voice (any range)(Fragment) [Litany For The Whale Harmonia Mundi 1958]

5:26 Audio Fragment from the TV documentaryIn Search of|episodeOther Voices scene: œIf Plants cancommunicate (Fragment) Original air date 4.17.1977

5:34 Christian Marclay- His master's voice (excerpt.1) (fragment) [Records 1997]

5:37 Les JuanitosExotica(Fragment) [Exotica 2007]

5:41 John Cage- Aria For Solo Voice (any range) (Fragment) [Litany For The Whale Harmonia Mundi 1958]

5:43 Jon Appleton Newark Airport Rock (Fragment) [Contes De La Memoire Empreintes DIGITALes 1996]

5:54 Jennifer Walshe- Nature Data For Voice (Fragment) [ Nature Data Interval Recordings 2005]

5:55 Andrea Belfi C (Fragment) [Wege Room40 2012]

6:02 David Toop- Seeds in Flight (Fragment) [Museum of Fruit Caipirinha Productions 1999]

6:07 Big Butter- People Animals and Plants (Fragment) [Goobers - A Collection Of Kids Songs T.E.C.Tones 1993]

6:07 David Rosenboom- Four Lines (Two High.1) (Fragment) [Brainwave Music EM Records 2006]

6:07 @C- 76.6 (Fragment) [Music For Empty Spaces Baskaru 2010]

6:19 Diatribes & Phonotopy-Partielle d'averse(Fragment) [Partielle d'averse Insubordinations 2010]

6:26 Craig Colorusso- Frozen Pond (Fragment) [Solar Boxes 2011]

6:39 Adriano Zanni-Sound of Ants(fragment) via Phonography.org

7:49 Hecker Speculative solution 1 (Fragment) [Speculative Solution Editions Mego 2011]

8:19 Mileece Aube (Fragment) [Formations Lo Recordings 2002]

8:21 Zeena Parkins & Ikue Mori- Blue Moon (Fragment) [Phantom Orchard Editions Mego 2004]

8:38 Tetsu Inoue& Seed( )Untitled (Panspermia) (Fragment) [VA Music For Plants PerfectIfOn 2005]

8:56 Audio Fragment fromMileece™s InstallationSoniferous Edenat MOMA's Pacific Design Centre 2010

9:37 Tetsu Inoue& Seed( )Untitled (Panspermi)a (Fragment) [VA-Music For Plants PerfectIfOn 2005]

9:49 Zeena Parkins & Ikue Mori- 39 Steps (Fragment) [Phantom Orchard]

9:52 Terence MckennaPlant Consciousness and Transformation(Fragment)

9:57 The Vegetable OrchestraTransplants(Fragment) [Onionoise Transacoustic-research 2010]

10:05 Jean Pierre Mirouze Sexopolis (Générique) (Fragment) [Le Mariage Collectif Disc'Az 1971]

10:06 Trevor Wishart Vox 01 (Fragment) [Vox Virgin Classics 1990]

10:11 Carl StoneNyala Second Section(Fragment) [Carl Stone 1196 em:t 1996]

10:18 Mileece Aube (Fragment) [Formations Lo Recordings 2002]

11:40 Lily Greenham- Circulation (Fragment) [Lingual Music Paradigm Discs 2007]

12:02 Kulananda (Michael Chaskalson)-Mindfulness of Reality(Fragment) via www.freebuddhistaudio.com

12:57 Hildegard Westerkamp-Elephant skin plant(Fragment) [VA - Musicworks 72: Outdoor Music Improvisation And Complexity Musicworks 1998]

13:29 Gabriel FauréPapillon Opus 71 for Cello(Fragment)

13:44 Diatribes & Phonotopy- Partielle d'Averse (Fragment) [Partielle d'Averse Insubordinatios 2010]

13:49 Sven Libaek- Nature Walkabout [Nature WalkaboutOST 1965]

13:50 Sound Effect: chalk writing by robinhood76 via freesound.org

13:55 Audio Fragment from the TV documentaryGift of GreenviaPrelinger Archives Sugar ResearchFoundation.

14:19 X-Flow- Small Power Plants (Fragment)

14:20 Victoria Looseleaf- In a Landscape (Fragment) [Harpnosis Goddess Records 1984]

14:21 Roland Alley Saya Mau Minum Air I Want to Drink Water [VA-Music For Plants PerfectIfOn 2005]

14:37 Ray & the Prisms- Astrograph (Fragment) [Timelapse in Colour Data Garden 2011]

14:50 Christian Marclay-Pandora's Box(Fragment) [Records 1981-1989 Atavistic 1997]

14:57 Molly Roth Sound Advice (Fragment) [Plant Talk/Sound Advice Plant Talk Productions 1976]

15:20 Barbara CartlandDream Lover(Fragment) [Barbara Cartland's Album of Love Songs State 1978]

15:41 Sound Effect: Zips via freesound.org

15:45 Id Loom-Finding Meaning(Fragment) [To: Atlantis 2012]

15:49 Sound Effect: Chainsaw tree cases by Ohrwurm via freesound.org

15:57 John Cage/Joan La Barbara-A Flower(Fragment) [Singing Through New Albion 1990]

16:14 Rully Shabara & Wukir Suryadi Warna (Fragement) [Senyawa 2010]

16:29 George Carlin-Battered Plants(Fragment) [Playin' With Your Head Eardrum Records 1986]

17:01 Johnny Hawkswort/Syd Dale- Catnap C. Tag [Accents on Percussion KPM Music 1966]

17:06 Christ Phyr Blyr- The Third Bardo of Jonathan Taylor Thomas Pater Noster (Fragment) [VA -(Triskaidekaphobia) 13 000.00 Milliseconds Ratskin Records 2008]

17:11 Sound Effect: Planetary flyby faster by Mattpavone via freesound.org

17:13 Panicsville Horaflora- Squirrel Play Time [VA - (Triskaidekaphobia) 13 000.00 Milliseconds RatskinRecords Ratskin Records 2008]

17:13 Chris Watson&Marcus Davidson- Midnight at the Oasis (Fragment) [Cross-Pollination Touch 2011]

17:19 Mira Calix Flicker (Fragment) [Skimskitta Warp Records 2003]

17:52 Sound Effect: Vent Wind 87 Bellac France by Ingeos via www.freesound.org

17:57 Hugo Montenegro& His Orchestra-Blowin' in the wind(Fragment)[Dawn of Dylan GWP 1970]

18:18 John Baker Heavy Plant Crossing (Fragment) [The John Baker Tapes Volume One: BBCRadiophonics Trunk Records 2008]

18:33 Zoltán Pongrácz- Madrigal on Petrarca's Sonnet (Fragment) [Hungarian Electroacoustic Music ByZoltán Pongrácz & Iván Patachich Hungaroton Classics 2001]

19:31 Mira Calix-Le Jardin de Barbican(Fragment) [3 Commissions Warp Records 2004]

20:25 TM ProductionsTomorrow Radio Drama(Fragment) [Tomorrow Radio TM Productions Inc. 1977]

20:27 Sound Effect: Weather Wave by Connum via www.freesound.org

20:29 Audio Fragment from the documentaryThe Secret Life of Plants 1979

20:48 Alastair CameronGentle Marimba(Fragment) [Free Film Music (cameronmusic.co.uk) 2011]

21:01 Sound Effect: Sound Clips fromVegetable ViolencebyHISS and ROAR

21:23 Audio fragment from the clipTrees Singingat Song & Spirit Center withBruce Hauschildt

21:31 TM ProductionsTomorrow Radio Drama(Fragment) [Tomorrow Radio TM Productions Inc. 1977]

21:39 David Toop- Watchtower Data (Fragment) [37th Floor At Sunset - Music For Mondophreneticâ„¢ SubRosa 2000]

22:02 Sound Effect: beep beep by leviclaassen via www.freesound.org

22:02 Nobuo Munakata-Photoconversion of Bilin Binding Phytochrome: From Pr to Pfr(Fragment) GeneMusic

22:16 TM ProductionsTomorrow Radio Drama(Fragment) [Tomorrow Radio TM Productions Inc. 1977]

22:25 Sound Effect: Electric Sparks by connum via www.freesound.org

22:26 Audio Fragment from the TV documentaryIn S ea rch o f|episodeOther Voices Original air date4.17.1977

22:26 Jon Appleton In Media Res (Fragment) [Contes de la Memoire Empreintes DIGITALes 1996]

23:30 Data Garden QuartetIntro(Fragment) [Quartet: Live at The Philadelphia Museum of Art DataGarden 2012]

24:35 Ryoichi Kurokawa- Sea in You (Fragment) [Copynature Progressive Form 2003]

24:36 Rita Abrams and Ken Melville- Sounds of Animals (Fragment) [Self Expression and Conduct - TheHumanities Harcourt Brace Johanovich Films 1976]

24:39 Edward Williams- The Sex Life of the Fern - Spores Fertilization and Growth - Pine Cones and ThePetrified Forest [Life on Earth: Music to the 1979 BBC TV Series Trunk Records 2009]

24:50 Miya Masakoa-Ritual with Giant Hissing Madagascar Cockroaches(Fragment) [VA -MusicOverheard: The Body Boston ICA 2007]

24:50 Lucio Capece & Lee Patterson- Coriolis (Fragment) [Empty Matter Another Timbre 2009]

24:50 BBC Radiophonic Workshop- Garden In Springtime (Binaural) (Fragment) [Sound Effects Vol. 23 -Relaxing Sounds BBC Records 1979]

25:00 Hildegard Westerkamp- Beneath the Forest Floor (Fragment) [Transformations EmpreintesDIGITALes 1996]

25:15 Charles Morrow- Arctic Kristallklar (Fragment) [VA -Riverrun ~ Voicings Soundscapes Wergo 1999)

25:16 Haruomi Hosono&Tadanori Yokoo- Hum Ghar Sajan (Fragment) [Cochin Moon King Records 1978]

28:29 erikm Atfoxpark Transfall (Fragment) [Transfall Room40 2011]

29:16 Annea Lockwood- The Glass World (The Glass Concert - Live 1966) (Fragment) [The Glass World 1966]

29:37 Sound Effect: Automatic sprinkler via freesound.org

29:46 Sound Effect: Modulated radio static by incarnadine via freesound.org

29:48 Audio Fragment fromSpace 1999; episode:The Troubled Spirit Original air date: 5 February 1976.

29:48 Haptic Entr'acte (Fragment) [Scilens Entr'acte 2011]

30:01 Pauline Oliveros- Humayun's Tomb (Fragment) [VA -Riverrun ~ Voicings Soundscapes Wergo 1999)

30:08 Nancy Walker With Sid Bass And His Orchestra Everything I™ve Got (Fragment) [I Hate Man RCACamden 1959]

30:09 Einhorn NikolausDon ™ t y o u may b e th e ess en tia l in ter vie w(Fragment) [VA - Futura Poesia Sonora Cramps Records 1978]

30:19 Dictaphone-Au Botanique(Fragment) [Poems From A Rooftop Sonic Pieces 2012]

30:19 Kanstantsin Yaskou- Ludus Mobilis II The Dance of Yin and Yang about The Deepest (Fragment)[Ludus Mobilis SDNM 2012]

30:27 Borful Tang- The Long Goodbye (Fragment) [Herd and Unherd Gigante Sound 2010]

30:30 junior85As It Happens pts 1-2(Fragment) [As It Happens pts 1-5 Record Records 2009]

30:36 Michael Stearns- Reky into Dark Territory (Fragment) [VA -A Storm of Drones Asphodel 1995]

30:37 Sound Effect: Autumn rain nov.2011 by kvgarlic via freesound.org

31:28 Audio Fragment from the short film trailerBugs and Heroes 2012

31:43 Cujo Cat People (Fragment) [Adventures In Foam Shadow Records 1997]

31:47 Peter Cusack&Max Eastley- Nest of Wasps (Fragments) [Day for Night Paradigm 2000]

32:35 Michael Prime Insect Wavelengths (Fragment) [Fructification Mycophile Records 1989]

33:04 The Vegetable Orchestra Malang (Fragment) [Onionoise Rough Trade 2010]

33:18 Audio fragments from an interview withMileeceabout theSoniferous EdenInstallation at MOCA™sPacific Design Centre onPacifica Radio Network

33:18 Lee RosevereNatural Animation(Fragment) [Colourless Green Ideas Sleep Furiously Happy PuppyRecords 2010]

33:19 Echoes Of Nature Tropical Rain (Fragment) [Rainforest: The Natural Sounds Of The Wilderness]

33:22 Lee Rosevere Germ of an Idea [Music for MOBA Happy Puppy records 2009]

Audio fragment from the clipTrees Singingat Song & Spirit Center withBruce Hauschildt

33:47 Alan Menken & Howard Ashman -Grow For Me(Fragment) [Little Shop Of HorrorsOST GeffenRecords 1986]

34:08 Julie Andrews-The Hills are Alive(Fragment) [The Sound of Music OST RCA Victor 1965]

34:16 The George Garabedian Players and The Awful Trumpet of Harry Arms Sound Of Music (Fragment)

34:31 Negativland-More Off-Air Surveys: Rainbow Gets Jammed Suicide Man's Universal Theory(Fragment) [Over the Edge Vol. 4: Dick Vaughn's Moribund Music]

34:34 Audio fragment from the clipTrees Singing at Songat Song & Spirit Center withBruce Hauschildt

34:35 Gregory Whitehead The Hidden Language of Trees (Fragment) [1998]

38:09 Chuck Bettis-Horror Storm(Fragment) [ Nautical Almanac: We Want War tour cdr 2002]

38:13 Eric Leonardson The March (Fragment) [Radio Reverie in the Waiting Place 1999]

38:14 Sound Effect:Thunder storm by rhumphries via freesound.org

38:25 Cujo Cat people (Fragment) [ Adventures In Foam NINEBARecords 1996]

38:32 My Robot Friend Hypno in (Fragment) [Dial 0 Soma Quality Recordings 2006]

38:32 Dave PhillipsA Drink on Spike Jonze(Fragment) [VA - Clinical Jazz (excerpt 1) 2008]

38:36 People Like UsSingin ™ in t h e sho wer(Fragment) [All Together Now 2006]

39:02 Sofia Gubaidulina- III (Fragment) [Symphony: 'Stimmen... Verstumm 1986]

39:02 Gene Kelly Singing in the rain (Fragment) [ Singing in the rain OST]

39:04 Diego StoccoMusic From a Tree(Fragment)

39:19 Cliff Ukelele Ike Edwards-Singing in the rain(Fragment) [ The Vintage Recordings of Ukulele Ike:1922-1944 2012]

39:30 Karl Heinz Jeron-Fresh Music For Rotten Vegetables(Fragment)

39:33 Dave PhillipsA Drink on Spike Jonze(Fragment) [VA - Clinical Jazz (excerpt 1) 2008]

39:34 Peyote Drug LSD

39:35 Andrew Pekler 01 (Excerpt) [ Ex Tempo Ra Plant Migration Records 2012]

39:36 Peyote Drug LSD

39:37 Audio Fragment from the movie Phenomenon (1996) -We're not so disconnected- GeorgeMalley/John Travolta.

39:51 Negativland- More Off-Air Surveys/Rainbow Gets Jammed/Suicide Man's Universal| (Fragment)[Over the Edge Vol. 4: Dick Vaughn's Moribund Music 2001]

40:08 Diego StoccoMusic From a Tree(Fragment)

40:10 John Cage- Third Interlude (Fragment) [American Classics Sonatas and Interludes for Prepared Piano(1946 - 48) Boris Berman]

40:12 Hildegard Westerkamp- Sensitive Chaos (Fragment) [VA -Site Of Sound: Of Architecture & The Ear Errant Bodies Press 1999]

40:16 George Martin talks toBernie Krause-Audio excerptfrom the documentaryThe Rhythm of Life BBC

40:20 Dick Hymanat the Lowery Organ-Stompin At The Savoy(Fragment) [Electrodynamics Command 1963]

40:26 Enoch Lightand the Light BrigadeBidin ™ M y Tim e(Fragment) [Vibrations Command 1962]

40:31 Sound Effect: Siamangs 01 (Fragment) by Soundbytez via Freesoung.org

41:10 Hildegard Westerkamp- Sensitive Chaos (Fragment) [VA -Site Of Sound: Of Architecture & The Ear Errant Bodies Press 1999]

41:36 Mesmin Nkounko Yaka (Fragment)[Congo Drums 1996]

41:44 Owen Marshall-Winter Butterfly(Fragment) [The Naked Truth Jazzman 2012]

42:03 David DunnThe Sound Of Light In Trees(Fragment) [ The Sound Of Light In Trees Earth Ear 2006]

42:13 Susumu Yokota Kinoko (Fragment) [Acid Mt. Fuji Sublime Records 1994]

42:42 Olaf Rupp Tony Buck Joe Williamson Shantung (Fragment) [Weird Weapons 2 Creative SourcesRecordings

42:49 Michael Prime- Forgotten Landscape (Fragment) [L-Fields Sonoris 2000]

43:11 Terence McKennaEverything Wants to Communicatean excerpt from Terence last interview byErikDavis(Wired)

43:33 Audio fragment from the movieClose Encounters of the Third Kind(1977) scene: a five-tone musicalphrase in a major scale sung by a tribe in India.

43:35 Tibetan Minstrel With His Young Son Singing Folk-Songs From Eastern Tibet Self-Accompagned ByPi-Wang

44:04 Audio Fragment from the documentaryThe Secret Life of Plants 1973

44:10 Fred Frith Portrait II (Fragment) [Middle Of The Moment ReR Megacorp 2004]

44:10 Nicolas Bernier- Cructacés (remix) (Fragment) [ VA -Marées de hauteurs diverses Insubordinations 2011]

44:11 X.Y. Zedd(Scott Paul Elledge) - Communication (Fragment) [ VA-PhonoStatic9: Concurrencies 1988 ]

44:12 Moondog-Frog Bog(Fragment) [ Moondog 1956]

44:15 P. Miles Bryson- (A Brief But Incongruous) Introduction On How To Wander Aimlessly And AchieveThe Newest Impossible Cosmetic Conspiracy (Fragment) [Megalomaniac Decorator's Quarterly IllegalArt 2005]

44:18 Audio fragments from an interview withMileeceabout theSoniferous EdenInstallation at MOCA™sPacific Design Centre onPacifica Radio Network

44:20 Audio fragment from the movieClose Encounters of the Third Kind(1977) scene: musical findingspresented at a French conference.

44:21 Fred Judd- Spoken Letter From Fred Judd To Tom Dissevelt (Fragment) [VA - Popular Electronics:Early Dutch Electronic Music From Philips Research Laboratories (1956 - 1963) Basta 2004 ]

44:26 Audio fragment fromAlice in Wonderland scene: Alice in the garden o_楬敶映潬敷獲攢Ā44:30

44:28 Anthony Moore- Secrets of the Blue Bag pt. 2 (Fragment) [Secrets Of The Blue Bag - A Story For JohnCage Polydor 1976]

44:30 Douglas Davis How to make Love to a Sound (Fragment) [Revolutions Per Minute (The Art Record) Ronald Feldman Fine Arts Inc 1982]

44:31 Audio fragment from the movieWhat about Bob?(1991) scene:Session with Dr. Leo Marvin

44:32 James Tenney Dialogue (Fragment) [Selected Works 1961-1969 Frog Peak Music 1992]

44:37 Lars Gunnar Bodin Cybo II (Fragment) [VA- The Pioneers: Five Text-Sound Artists Phono Suecia 1992]

44:44 Walter Cianciusi- Computer Music (Jungle) (Fragment) [Computer Music 2002]

44:46 Godblesscomputers Natrlich (Fragment) [ Swanism Fresh yO! 2012]

44:52 Hildegard Westerkamp- Into The Labyrinth (Fragment) [Into India Earsay Productions 2002]

45:11 Craig Vear Bumble Wood (Fragment) [Au d Ra lp h Ro as™le Gruenrekorder 2010]

45:34 Christoph Höfferl- Interpretation concert for Plants synthesizer and laptop (listen) (Fragment)

45:51 Pharoah Sanders- Don Cherry Interview - Ornette's Influence Pt. 1 (Fragment) [The Pharoah SandersStory: In the Beginning 1963-1965 Esp Disk Ltd. 2012]

45:54 John Cage/Amadinda Percussion Group-Child of Tree(Fragment) [Works For Percussion Vol.6(1975 - 1991) Hungaroton Records 2011]

46:02 Nuno Canavarro Untitled (Fragment) [Plux Quba Ama Romanta 1988]

46:04 Talking Tree- Definitely no Shortage of Water these Last Couple of Days (Fragment) viawww.talking-tree.com

46:19 Miya Masaoka-Pieces for Plants #7 NYU (Fragment) viawww.miyamasaoka.com

47:04 Pierre-Yves Macé Faux Jumeaux (Fragment) [Faux Jumeaux Tzadik 2002]

47:09 John CageBranches(Fragment) [Branches Edition Wandelweiser Records 1999]

47:44 Sei A You Can Bring (Fragment) [You Can Bring EP Simple Records 2012]

47:57 Uakti Arrumação (Fragment) [VA -Orbitones Spoon Harps & Bellowphones Ellipsis Arts 1998]

48:02 People Like Us Seven Degrees (Fragment) [This Is Light Music Edinburgh Printmakers 2010 ]

48:04 Pompey Garden Media (Fragment) [Bivouac Sack Pocketclock 2010]

48:05 Jared C. BaloghThe Happy Doom Wacky Pecking Order(Fragment) [Detaching Realities Vol 2 Headphonica 2012]

48:06 Felix Kubin Do Electric Sheep Dream of Carnivorous Plants? (Fragment) [VA -Minute Papillon Second Language 2011]

48:07 Michael Prime- Listen To Peyote (Fragment) [L-Fields Sonoris 2000]

48:07 Jared C. Balogh Sugar Boogies (Fragment) [Detaching Realities Vol. 2 Headphonica 2012]

48:17 Molly RothPlant Talk(Fragment) [Plant Talk Productions]

48:47 Erling Wold-Tune for Lynn Murdock #2(Fragment) [Tellus #14: Just Intonation 1986]

48:51 Headboggle- Boo (Fragment) [Clavioline Demo And Living Stereo Wagon 2009]

48:52 Chris Watson- Scanuppia (Fragment) [Cima Verde Fondazione Edmund Mach 2008]

48:53 Maggi Payne- Interpolation - mobile pour flute (1 2 et 3) (Fragment) [The Extended Flute NewWorld Records 2007]

48:56 Ben Patterson 370 Flies (Fragment ) [ Drip Music / 370 Flies Alga Marghen 2003]

48:59 John CageBranches(Fragment) [Branches Edition Wandelweiser Records 1999]

49:11 Sound Effect:Water Spray Bottle(Binaural) via SOUNDsculptures

50:35 Mort GarsonPlantasia[Mother Earth's Plantasia Homewood Records 1976 ]

Interview: Bartholomäus Traubeck on 'Years'

For people that are seeing Years for the first time, can you give a brief description?

It’s basically a modified turntable that uses a camera as a pickup and that samples a microscopically small image of the year rings. Those are then translated into sound by programming. It’s not a very direct translation. I tried it first and, I wasn’t able to build anything that really worked that produces sound output. So I went with translating the visual image into piano tones which sounds nicer.

So, you tried it by taking the data and having that make the tones rather than having it translated to a 12 tone system?

I really tried sonifying with opto-sensors. It’s just not really controllable what kind of image you get. You can only go for the brightness values of a certain point. It’s just not enough data. It doesn’t relate to the year rings actually, or not that much. And then again I tried just sonifying the image but it’s really hard because it’s a pixel based image. With analog media you can just input it and just change cables and put a video signal into a stereo if you want to. But digital it’s really hard to have it make sense. I just failed at that and I decided to make a generative sound machine that is being interpreted by the year rings.

So I guess it doesn’t follow the rings, but how do you get it to play the whole piece of wood?

The tone arm moves to the inside in a linear fashion. There’s a certain time that I set and it takes that amount of time to move to the center of the record. The year rings are so non-perfectly circular, that I couldn’t follow them. So whenever there’s a tree ring in the field of view of this microscopic camera, it releases an event.

bartholomaus-traubeck-years.jpeg

Do you have a musical background?

Not at all. This is partly why I was interested in doing this. I really enjoy working with sound. Actually, I have a very visual background. I studied graphic design, mostly. Graphic design can be so limiting in some ways because you train your vocabulary. For me, I had these different vocabularies that I was always working in. It was hard to get out of that and since I had no musical background, it was very interesting to work (with sound) because you can produce ideas that would be very different from the approaches that you usually take. You’re losing a lot of your intuitive manners that you acquired over the years. You have to find a new approach. I like to work with sound and I enjoy this a lot but I really do not have any gift for composition and stuff like that. But then again, I like to produce sounding objects.

Like, with Years, I set a rule set for the compositions by programming and building this machine which has some kind of internal rules of how it works so it can’t just produce any sound but then again the composition is actually then being made by the tree’s data, which is not really random. Some people would say it is random but I think it’s not because it has a very special structure and follows certain rules that derive from other systems, like ecological systems. But there is always a rule-set to find in there.

It’s interesting you mention coming from a graphic design background. Something I see inYears is that it’s a very different way of experiencing a plant through time. I almost get this feeling that it’s an audio version of a reverse timelapse. Is there a reason that you picked audio to express this idea? Is that the idea, or am I just interpreting something?

No, that’s good. What you said is something actually I just stumbled over yesterday. For me, the thought of this compressed amount of time and the amount of time that’s actually needed to grow this structure and this data set is a very important interest in the medium of the physical representation of the time of the song. I didn’t specifically think about it when working on it. For me, it was interesting to compress this amount of time into this visual structure and then again make a song out of this.

On regular vinyl, there is this groove that represents however long the track is. There’s a physical representation of the length of the audio track that’s imprinted on the record. The year rings are very similar because it takes a very long time to actually grow this structure because it depends on which record you put on of those I made. It’s usually 30 to 60 or 70 years in that amount of space. It was really interesting for me to have this visual representation of time and then translate it back into a song which it wouldn’t originally be.

In terms of generative art and music. What are some of your influences. Do you see this work as part of a certain movement?

There’s a lot of works that I admire. Maybe the one that’s closest that I really like is. Céleste Boursier-Mougenot. I think it’s kind of similar, actually. I see them all as algorythms and rules. Certain systems for making another composition. This one really impressed me when I saw it because it’s, aesthetically very beautiful and in a way it can initiate some certain thought’s but it’s not too concrete and it’s far from esoteric. You can say, this is the song that the bird sings or plays or whatever but it’s certainly with the result of all of these influences and all of this environment and also the way a bird actually works. It’s very interesting.

Have you done any research in the field of bioelectronics and this merging of biological and digital?

I wouldn’t say research. I looked a lot into dendrochronology, the science of reading data out of tree rings. Then I went further and tried to see plants or trees as part of manifested algorithms. DNA is like a program that’s run and depending on which environment it’s running it will develop differently. I tried to see this in stone formations in marble but there is no algorithm because it’s not alive but it can still be an archive for data. I guess nowadays, everything can be data or can be an archive or a database.

I think we have this affinity towards seeing concepts as binary. There’s always this thing and then there’s its opposite and this is the very prevalent view; culture and nature or technology and nature. I try not to see it that way because just culture and technology is just a very far developed result of nature, actually… what we call nature, which would be life in general. Everything we do has to be a result of nature, I guess. For some philosophical thought processes, you need to make this division between culture and nature. Sometimes, it’s very interesting to just see it as one is the result of the other and it’s just an ongoing process.

The Ars Electronica is going very strongly in that direction. They have had a category for bio-art which is really interesting because this is something you do not come across in contemporary art.

Is there a reason you picked those particular sounds?

I felt that it would make sense to use the piano because, first of all, a piano is something you are very used to and it has a very long tradition. The piano itself always sounds the same for hundreds of years, probably now it’s been the way it’s played that’s always different. Second of all, the piano has a certain range of tones and there are no tones in between. In a regular piano, there are 88 keys, so this helped me make it a little more pleasant. Since there is no actual representation for the sound of wood, I guess, because there is no real sound of wood, I would say. I thought, I could practically use anything. It doesn’t need to be some abstract sine wave or modulation of something. And I looked into piano samples and it sounded good. It’s an instrument that you’re really used to, being socialized in a Western country. It made sense somehow.

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Did you do anything with other sounds besides piano? Would you be interested in doing an audio-only piece like an album?

Actually, I’m doing that right now because, first of all, I was approached by a London label that wants to do a small release of different trees just out of this piano machine, which is something I was planning to do anyway, just for myself. I did not want to make a very long video with all of the woods but I thought to really hear the difference, it would be nice.

And then again, I’m working on something more abstract that’s a feedback experiment where there is one sound going in through all of these effects and there’s a very long stream generated. There was this mathematical experiment where they say every breath you take includes one molecule of the last breath of Mozart or Caesar. It’s been re-calculated and they say it’s a 98.2% chance that this actually happens. Inspired by this thought is that you just have one sound to generate this feedback loop and it generates this sound-stream that evolves and informs itself. But it’s not actually the sound. I mean, you can’t actually hear the sound you sent in anymore because the effects are taking over and they shape the sound. Then you don’t really know anymore. Is it a product of just manipulating the effects? But the effect itself cannot produce a sound without an input. So I was interested in that, so that might be something I do next.

So, there’s this loss of understanding between the source and what is being produced.

It was with the Years piece because the sound is coming from the wood but it’s also coming from me somehow. It would be interesting to blur these boundaries. Like with this piece again with the birds on the strings, I’m really interested in just building setups and rule sets that I can apply to something and then I’m not really involved in the actual composition or the making of the piece itself anymore. This is something that I find very interesting. I really like to more design processes and apply them to something. It’s not just random, it’s this interplay with this rule set.

Thanks so much for taking the time to speak with us.

Thank you, it’s been great.

BARTHOLOMÄUS TRAUBECK

Years on Vimeo

Interview conducted by Joe Patitucci

Interview: Hans-Joachim Rodelius

 
roedelius.jpg

Hans-Joachim Roedelius’s work has been a huge influence on us here at Data Garden. We came across Cluster as we were trying to find an electronic language of our own and were surprised to hear so many commonalities with these new 35 year old sounds.

Data Garden caught up with our favorite electronic pastoralist on his way to Moogfest where he performed 10/29/2011.

The Self Portrait is very simple and meditative. What sort of concept were you thinking of when you started writing those records?

There was no concept. I was just doing it because there was not much possibility. There was no machinery to do really good technical work.

At the time, you were also working with Cluster. Was that a big change in terms of possibilities – bringing your personal work into a group setting?

I was always interested to find my own tone language. Not only with Cluster. I started with others. I didn’t work as a soloist in the beginning. I worked with many people in Berlin at the time at the Zodiac. There were 8 people and there’s a record here available. The first ever recorded material from 1968 when we were people just trying to find out what’s going on, what we could do and which way we could do a relevant kind of tone art. So this was the beginning. And then when I got to be with Conrad Schnitzler as Kluster with a K and afterwards as Cluster with a C, every free minute, I tried to do my own music.

Have you always been a full time self-employed musician or have you had other jobs?

No, I am a masseur as a profession. I always had to do it to survive in the beginning of my career. Afterwards, I tried to survive with Cluster in a very rural part of Germany and I tried to be a gardener and work in the woods and bring wood for the stove in the wintertime. And to find food in the forest and mushrooms, and make my own bread and try to be a farmer somehow to get to the roots.

A small sculpture carved by Roedelius while living in rural Germany

 A small sculpture carved by Roedelius while living in rural Germany

A small sculpture carved by Roedelius while living in rural Germany

Sowiesosso is one of our favorite albums. Between the cover and the sounds, there’s definitely a natural feeling to it. Can you talk a little about where you think that may come from or what your environment was at that time?

I was very very happy at that time. I had a wife. I had a child. I could do gardening. I had to do a lot of hand work and I think that was very good for me because I came from a very big city and from traveling because with Kluster we were on the road for 2 years across Europe. It was a very unstable life, unsafe, unsecure with no money – just trying to survive doing art. Then I settled down and got to know my wife and family and I could work for my own living. I was so happy and I think it is all mirroring in the music.

Have things changed a lot over the years?

No. We have 3 children and 2 grandsons. I am still doing a lot of housework. My wife is a teacher and she is earning the regular money. 3 years ago it started that I could earn a living because of music. It needed that long that people could understand what I am doing. Like you. You know what’s in the music. At the time, nobody knew. We had to learn how to do it and people had to learn what it is we are doing. It’s weird and understandable. Now people understand it and I can make a living from it. I like to tour as well. This tour, I’m supported by my guys who are with me. Chandra Shukla and Jason Scott Furr organized the tour between ATP and Moogfest. Normally I would fly just for ATP and then come back. They arranged it and they are supporting. Chandra is driving and they have a new label. They’re releasing on Erototox Recordings.

So do you have any new solo work coming out on the new label?

New solo work just came out on a label in Vienna. It’s called Ex Animo. There’s a collaborative record that just came out recently with a guy from Map Station. Then there is the new Qluster with a Q.

Are you just going to keep making records in the hundreds?

It just happens. It’s not by purpose. It just happens accidentally.

On that note of things just happening. When do you find the theme? How do you name an album?

It’s the second process of creativity if you’re doing music like I’m doing it. I don’t know what I’m doing. I have to listen to it and then I have to try to find something equal to the music. It’s the second creative process. Music came out of living and it happened like that because I have no academic education. I had to do it like this. Normally people go from the beginning learning an instrument and rehearsing every day and playing the instrument well. It’s a different approach to music if you really have to learn what is this sound, what is it doing? How does it work? How do people react to it? It’s a long process if you do it like this and I think it’s a good way to make your own music. And it’s really your own because you had to feel what the sound is and what the tone is to be able to work with it in a relevant way.

Who was your main inspiration to start playing improvised music? Any earlier pioneers?

I listened to Xenakis and Pierre Henry and to the old avant garde in France but I never listened to Stockhausen because that was not my thing. I didn’t like it in fact. I never liked very much Kraftwerk. I wanted to do my own thing. I wanted to become able to create my own tone language and I did. I think it worked out well. People know now when they listen to Roedeleus music, it’s Roedelius music. It’s incomparable in a way.

How do you feel that people in our generation think of you as a pioneer in electronic music?

It was not my aim. I just wanted to do myself what I like to do. I was a physical therapist for 10 years and was meant to be working in a hospital or a wellness center or something like that. It was not my aim but it worked out like this and I’m very happy about it. You see because people are coming and listening.

Moogfest
Hans Joachim Roedelius
Ex Animo by Hans Joachim Roedelius
Qluster




 

Bio-Sensing Art in the 1970s

 

Data Garden interviews bio-art pioneer Richard Lowenberg.

The artist has exhibited internationally since the late ’60s- trailblazing the fields of bio-sensing, video-media-performance arts, tele-community development, information ecology and bio-regional activism & planning.

 Brainwave and plant music from The Secret Life of Plants, 1976.

Brainwave and plant music from The Secret Life of Plants, 1976.

Thanks for joining us for our first interview! Can you brief us on the origins of your bio-communication art?

In 1970, I began actively working with new portable video systems, and with Woody and Steina Vasulka (Kitchen founders, 1971), explored the interface between various analogue audio and video synthesis systems; not to make programs, but rather to play in the realms of electronic signals, feedback and noise. I also met Peter Crown, Ph.D., physiological psychiatrist, and together we built simple EEG biofeedback systems, which we used as interface with audio/video synthesizers, and we had weekly evening presentations at the Kitchen.  Our tools and abilities were limited.

 Jim Wiseman working with Paik/Abe and Sandin Video Processors.

Jim Wiseman working with Paik/Abe and Sandin Video Processors.

In the mid-70’s I settled in the San Francisco Bay Area, in large part to attempt collaborative art-science work with NASA Ames Research Center. A number of creative projects resulted from the ‘informal’ collaboration among artists and scientists/technologists through 1981, beginning with use of multi-channel bio-telemetry devices and remote sensing systems with dancers (EMG muscle monitoring); wind-tunnel and multi-spectral imaging (thermography, holographic interferometry and schlierren) experiments; CTS satellite communication/performance projects; and gravitational simulation and performance experiments (Gravitational-Field-Day), which were funded in part by the NEA, and came to an abrupt end shortly after the presidential election of Ronald Reagan.

 John Lifton prepares a plant for live performance.

John Lifton prepares a plant for live performance.

In early 1976 the producer and director of an about to be made feature film, based on the book, The Secret Life of Plants, brought John Lifton to San Francisco to work with me on sequences we designed for the film. I also brought in Tom Zahuranec and Jim Wiseman for this project, which shot sequences at the Plant Conservatory in Golden Gate Park and at the World Stage soundstage in Hollywood. John, who I had previously met in London and worked with in Telluride, CO through the mid-90s, is an architect/planner and composer who built early digital audio processing systems, and had premiered Green Music (plant sensing) in London in 1975. Tom worked at Mills College and was interfacing plants and other bio-signals with a Tcherepnin audio synthesizer that he helped to build.   Jim was a video artist/videographer who built his Paik-Abe synthesizerwhile at CalArts and his Sandin Image Processor while at the Chicago Art Institute. I provided the multi-channel bio-telemetry (wireless FM transmitting) systems which we monitored up to six dancers’ brain waves and muscle electrical potential signals, as voltage-control inputs to the audio and video systems, in compositional sync with John Lifton’s multi-channel audio output generated by gold needle electrode sensing of plant physiology. The film ultimately used little of our recorded performances, was not widely released (production conflicts) and is difficult to find copies of. Plants were only one of many living organisms that we worked with, along with environmental monitoring/sensing/transducing, as basis for creative media-performance works: Bio-Dis-Plays.

 Tom Zahuranec routes amplified plant energy into handmade Tcherepnin synthesizers.

Tom Zahuranec routes amplified plant energy into handmade Tcherepnin synthesizers.

What were the some of the difficulties of interfacing living systems with video synthesizers and early digital computers?

The works alluded to above, were being done during the period of transition from analogue to digital technologies. They were designed, yet trial and error efforts. Many informal experiments, as well as public performances were conducted over many years. Each time, allowed us to involve other collaborators (David Rosenboom, Paul Demarinis, Virginia Quesada, Henry Dakin, Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz, Keija Kimura, Margaret Fisher, Judith Azur and more), new technologies and processes.  More than ever, bio and eco-systems sensing and processing continues to be an area of rich creative exploration, tool-building and performance/installation by many others, currently.

 Video feedback produced by Jim Wiseman.

Video feedback produced by Jim Wiseman.

There was a popular horticultural interest in the 1970s, as well as the study of ‘plant consciousness’. Have you found any evidence of this in your work?

Plants are sensitive, in-tune, living beings. We still barely understand their physiology (such as photo-synthetic conversion of light into energy). I have always been careful not to project inferences on the meaning of the simple signals which we were sensing and processing. They are part of our complex, inter-dynamic, co-evolutionary environment, which we simply wanted to tune into and present publicly, without explanation.

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In your 2005 proposition for a slow-tech movement, you’ve stated "...technological progress is rapidly outpacing and out of sync with social progress and development.” Do you feel that today’s art benefits from or is hindered by technological advances?

Technology takes many forms, being an evolutionary by-product of our human relationship to our surrounding environment and circumstances, physically, socially, conceptually. Current technological development is largely fostered by our political-economic systems, which in part, promote ‘consumerism’ and large scale ignorance of ecological processes; resource extraction, to materials processing, to waste production. The arts have also been largely complicit in a myopic understanding and involvement in the use of technologies, with primary interest in so-called media technologies (not energy, medical, military or transportation technologies).

Artists, given their self-endowed freedom of expression and livelihood, have also led the way technologically, and scientifically, from the beginnings of human development (from writing, and printing, to photography and sound recording, to inner and outer space exploration.

 BAJA site performance, 1975

BAJA site performance, 1975

For the last many years, a key area of my creative work has been focused on ‘economics’; what and how we value tangibles and intangibles, as the framework for social cohesion and development. In that context, my interests and works address the nature of ‘information’, within a better whole systems understanding of ecological economics; care of our household. Finally, I have learned that all of my works in the realms of the senses, have primarily been about people, about how to respect and work together, about how to collaborate beyond short term project goals, and about how creative intention, attitude and example can inspire people to needed transcendence.

How has your early work influenced your current work as a large-scale information architect and community planner?

As stated in the beginning, the early biofeedback experiments were part of an ongoing exploration and creation of works which look at portions of our electromagnetic information environment. As an artist, my central interest is in how we (all things) sense and communicate. In playing with NASA (plus Stanford Medical Center, SRI, Xerox PARC, Washington Research Center, etc.), I also became familiar with the ARPANet, satellite communications, the Home Brew Club and Community Memory, which laid a foundation for what by the late ‘80s had evolved to be termed ‘community networking’ initiatives. Telluride, which John Lifton and I were involved in the regional master planning of from the late ‘70s through the mid-‘90s, became a pioneering test-bed for ‘community networking’, as our InfoZone project made Telluride the first rural Internet POP and first wireless WAN in this country in the early ‘90s. Since then, I have had the opportunity to direct a community networking project based in Davis, CA, and by invitation have had involvements in local-global Internetworking efforts throughout the US, as well as in Japan, Europe and Latin America. In 2006 I settled in Santa Fe, founded the 1st-Mile Institute, joined planning firm, Design Nine Inc. (led by Andrew Cohill, Ph.D., and contracting inter-nationally), and have been contracted to lead New Mexico next many years of broadband networking and networked society-building, for the State. Our evolving ‘information society’ and ‘information revolutions’ continue to be about how we sense and communicate. Our tools are simply ‘sensory aids’. My early path continues to be on-course through the still poorly understood ‘information environment’.

For the last many years, a key area of my creative work has been focused on ‘economics’; what and how we value tangibles and intangibles, as the framework for social cohesion and development. In that context, my interests and works address the nature of ‘information’, within a better whole systems understanding of ecological economics; care of our household. Finally, I have learned that all of my works in the realms of the senses, have primarily been about people, about how to respect and work together, about how to collaborate beyond short term project goals, and about how creative intention, attitude and example can inspire people to needed transcendence.

How has your early work influenced your current work as a large-scale information architect and community planner?

As stated in the beginning, the early biofeedback experiments were part of an ongoing exploration and creation of works which look at portions of our electromagnetic information environment. As an artist, my central interest is in how we (all things) sense and communicate. In playing with NASA (plus Stanford Medical Center, SRI, Xerox PARC, Washington Research Center, etc.), I also became familiar with the ARPANet, satellite communications, the Home Brew Club and Community Memory, which laid a foundation for what by the late ‘80s had evolved to be termed ‘community networking’ initiatives. Telluride, which John Lifton and I were involved in the regional master planning of from the late ‘70s through the mid-‘90s, became a pioneering test-bed for ‘community networking’, as our InfoZone project made Telluride the first rural Internet POP and first wireless WAN in this country in the early ‘90s. Since then, I have had the opportunity to direct a community networking project based in Davis, CA, and by invitation have had involvements in local-global Internetworking efforts throughout the US, as well as in Japan, Europe and Latin America. In 2006 I settled in Santa Fe, founded the 1st-Mile Institute, joined planning firm, Design Nine Inc. (led by Andrew Cohill, Ph.D., and contracting inter-nationally), and have been contracted to lead New Mexico next many years of broadband networking and networked society-building, for the State. Our evolving ‘information society’ and ‘information revolutions’ continue to be about how we sense and communicate. Our tools are simply ‘sensory aids’. My early path continues to be on-course through the still poorly understood ‘information environment’.

Links and References

Richard Lowenberg: http://www.radlab.com/

Interview by Alex Tyson

Listen to live Plant Music

See Data Garden’s work with plants: Data Garden QUARTET

Listen to an album of plant-controlled music designed by Data Garden artist, Joe Patitucci.